Tough guys don’t fight. a salute to Jockey’s

 

I have just google searched “fighting jockeys” I needed a photo for a blog I am writing. I expected to find a plethora of photos of little men in their silks punching the tripe out of each other in the jockey’s enclosure.In this day of social media everyone has a camera, you can’t have a disagreement in a pub with out going viral, every bully at school is rightfully exposed all over the web, arguments in the traffic make the evening news, so in the jockeys enclosure with over a hundred years of cameras all over them and hundreds of race meetings around the world every day, these adrenaline filled little packets of testosterone would surely produce some fiery moments of madness after some imbecile, cuts them off on a run costing millions to the owner or clips the heels of their horse potentially causing them and their horse serious injury. Just the moment of the contest is enough to make footballers or even cyclists, politicians for that matter, strike out in anger sometimes costing themselves thousands of dollars in fines and damaging reputations.

So now to select my crazy wrestling jockeys. “One incident!! Photos of one incident!!”
What an incredibly disciplined bunch of men. Millions of potential issues, no doubt, multimillions of opportunities to catch it when it does happen. Anyone who has been in any highly charged competitive environment must surely salute to this magnificent example of respect and control, Where else in this day and age is such chivalry exhibited. A credit to these knights of the racing industry. I certainly won’t be posting any photos of jockeys fighting.

jockeys

Horses for courses

HORSES FOR COURSES by Scott Brodie.

“I just can’t understand it”
Said the weekend farming man
“My horses are all ratty
And I do the best I can,

I feed them all the good stuff,
All the oats that they can eat
And still it seems impossible
To keep my bloody seat.”

“Do you think its in the breeding?
See they’re all by the same sire,
If you can’t sort this problem out
from riding I’ll retire.”

“Already had a broken arm
And close calls by the ton,
I think I’d have a heart attack
With just another one.”

Now I can’t knock a challenge back
And I couldn’t understand
How they could be such yang-yangs,
They were gentlemen in hand.

So I climbed upon the first one
and I rode him round the yard
he responded fairly smartly
and his mouth was far from hard.

well I had him going backwards
forwards, sideways, up and down
and he spun upon a sixpense
when I asked him to come round.

the rest were all about the same
and I couldn’t understand
but my ego, it was growing
with my chest at full expand.

I said “for sure I’ll ride your horses
And I’ll get the things to go,
For I’m a mounted trooper
And there’s little I don’t know.

“I’ve ridden horses around the town
In streets alive with folk,
Its takes some sort of horseman
To go riding in the smoke.”

“I’ve passed under the harbour bridge
And round circular quay,
I’ve worked up at the mardi gras
It didn’t bother me.”

“In apprehending baddies
I’ve excelled and that’s the truth.
And when I’m mounted on my horse
By geez I’m bullet proof.”

“Well ribbons, I’ve won plenty
When I’ve gone to Sydney show.
And when I ride to music, what?
I tell you I can go.”

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“I don’t think there’ll be a problem
With the neddies you’ve got here.”
By crikey he looked happy
Had a smile from ear to ear.

So I worked the horses in the yard
It didn’t take a week,
Till I had them doing dressage
And convinced I was a freak.

I taught the buggers jumping
And they caught on pretty fast,
It seemed that they’d do anything
That I would care to ask.

So once I thought I’d done the job
I called the farmer out,
And of my riding expertise
I left no trace of doubt.

I jumped them over obstacles
On two tracks showed their flair,
Piaffe, passage, through water jumps
Impossible to scare.

The farmer stood and scratched his head
“I think you’ve won the battle,
But the biggest problem that I’ve had
Is working them on cattle.”

I couldn’t see a problem there,
The way I’d schooled them up,
They’d work the cows around the joint
Just like a heeler pup.

I saddled up my favourite one
And with blatant disregard,
I pointed him towards the gate
And jumped him from the yard.

No sooner had he hit the ground
And spied a murray grey,
He took the bit between his teeth
And carted me away.

I tried to pull the bastard ‘round
But he was on the hop,
Away towards the scattering mob
He wasn’t going to stop.

He zigged and zagged and weaved about
Amongst the bolting herd,
He’d been so quiet a while ago
It all seemed so absurd.

He spun to the left, and then to the right
And left me in the air,
And dumped me in the dust and dirt
Before I was aware.

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And as he turned to bolt away
By geez I got a shock,
Piaffe, passage, and piroette
Amongst the scattering stock.

This horse did not belong out here
With cattle on the land,
Arenas mowed and manicured
With cheering from the stand,

Was where he should be working
And I’d no right here either.
A stock horse trainer and rider
I realised I was neither.

So now I stick to what I know,
I bought the farmers horses,
And weekly ride them out to shows
And quote, “horses for courses”

The thoroughbred , the breed for every need

 

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If you want to go to the Olympics for dressage get a Warmblood.

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Thoroughbred

If you want to Compete at the world cutting championships get a stock horse or quarter horse.

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Thoroughbred

For polo you’ll need a polo pony,

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Thoroughbred

endurance an Arab, maybe you just want to trail ride and you just want to be a passenger, some half draft mixture might be good.

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Thoroughbred

Eventing you need an all rounder, the Thoroughbred is the supreme all rounder he can compete at the highest level in any of of the afor mentioned disciplines. Australian equestrianism has, since its arrival on the world equestrian stage in Stockholm in 1956, largely ridden on the back of the Australian thoroughbred.

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Thoroughbred

Australia has over time become a power house in the eventing world and thoroughbreds have featured prominently in its success. As we here in Australia crave every new and exotic breed to come out of Europe the Europeans are treasuring the Australian thoroughbred as the horse of the moment.
Recently whilst interviewing the great Olympian Bill roycroft shortly before his death, he stressed to me that unless a horse was thoroughbred or 9/10 so, it would struggle at the top level of eventing, Bill as with many Australia Olympic heroes have relied on horses retired from the racing industry to take them to top competition.

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Bill roycroft on “our solo” thoroughbred

If you are a really serious competitor If you want to go to the Olympics for dressage get a Warmblood.( or a thoroughbred)
If you are a weekend warrior going out to enjoy your horse sports consider the thoroughbred. He is capable of adjusting to any sport if you are a good enough horse person. He is cheap and available, maybe you will need some help to get him re started but if you find the right one you won’t be sorry. Spend the $20,ooo you were going to spend on the Warmblood on lessons you will be way better off.
Thoroughbreds the breed for every need.

Horses From Courses
by Scott Brodie

Available for purchase on Apple iBooks, Google Books, Amazon Kindle, Kobo and other online ebook vendors.

Every year thousands of Thoroughbred ex-racehorses, often referred to as OTTB, (off-the-track thoroughbreds) retire from the racing industry, their future uncertain. Many well-meaning horse enthusiasts seek to take these horses and retrain them for sport and recreational purposes.

This book takes the accumulated experience and knowledge of horse trainer Scott Brodie—Manager of the NSW Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Trust and re trainer of hundreds of ex-racehorses—and allows the novice trainer to tap into this valuable source of information previously unattainable for the average horse enthusiast.

Scott Brodie author of Horses From Courses is Manager of the RacingNSW Thoroughbred Retraining Program. A NSW Mounted Police horse trainer and classically trained rider, Scott has a has a generously empathetic philosophy to handling horses and a unique spin on the retraining of retired racehorses. Utilising a surprisingly smooth synergy of natural horsemanship and the practical application of classical dressage, Scott’s systematic approach to this often difficult and dangerous endeavour ensures the smoothest and fairest transition for the horse from racing machine to a pleasurable riding partner.

Between fist and spur

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Knuckles white and shining spur,
Why won’t you relax you cur ?
You just can’t seem to do it.
The mongrel he’s had every chance
And all he does is jib and dance
Or sort of kangaroo it.

I push him forward with two whips
But all I get is sideways skips
I just can’t understand.
My fingers they begin to ache
He’s weaving froward like a snake
And though his breedings grand.

If I can’t sort this problem out
Of to the doggers there’s no doubt
And it won’t be much longer.
I’m holding him with all my might
And still he’s falling to the right
His pull is getting stronger.

My legs are jammed with vice like grip
I’m cramping through my weary hip
I dare not leave them resting.
Or he’d reverse at gallop speed
Amphetamines I think I need
My stamina he’s testing.

My reins are threatening to snap
But I cannot afford to nap
Or through the wall I’m going.
If I eased up my grip at all
Upon his nose I’m sure he’d fall
Perhaps my sport is rowing.

His grandad won Olympic gold
Must be the black sheep of the fold
A throwback in the breeding.
His confirmations not in doubt
And can’t he move himself about
But still he’s not worth feeding.

Now running free, perfectly fine
His movements not short of Divine
He’s elegant and graceful.
His image does emotion stir but
Bridled between fist and spur
The performance is disgraceful

Scott brodie

Horses From Courses
by Scott Brodie

Available for purchase on Apple iBooks, Google Books, Amazon Kindle, Kobo and other online ebook vendors.

Every year thousands of Thoroughbred ex-racehorses, often referred to as OTTB, (off-the-track thoroughbreds) retire from the racing industry, their future uncertain. Many well-meaning horse enthusiasts seek to take these horses and retrain them for sport and recreational purposes.

This book takes the accumulated experience and knowledge of horse trainer Scott Brodie—Manager of the NSW Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Trust and re trainer of hundreds of ex-racehorses—and allows the novice trainer to tap into this valuable source of information previously unattainable for the average horse enthusiast.

Scott Brodie author of Horses From Courses is Manager of the RacingNSW Thoroughbred Retraining Program. A NSW Mounted Police horse trainer and classically trained rider, Scott has a has a generously empathetic philosophy to handling horses and a unique spin on the retraining of retired racehorses. Utilising a surprisingly smooth synergy of natural horsemanship and the practical application of classical dressage, Scott’s systematic approach to this often difficult and dangerous endeavour ensures the smoothest and fairest transition for the horse from racing machine to a pleasurable riding partner.