Part 8 re training the ex racehorse

As the horse is moving around you in leg yield ask him to halt at the time he is closest and parallelto a fence or wall. This needs to be solidly established, utilising both voice command and a physical halt aid initiated and support by inside flexion. By breaking the alignment of the horses spine with inside flexion and bend and a slight leg yield we reduce the horses ability to resist and with well timed reward will promote submission leading to to soft and obedient halts and eventually transitions in general . Eventually you will be able to move along the wall periodically flexing to a halt combined with voice command. Utilising the whip and voice commands ask the horse to walk forward and then halt repeatedly until it becomes
conditioned reflex.

Horses From Courses
by Scott Brodie

Available for purchase on Apple iBooks, Google Books, Amazon Kindle, Kobo and other online ebook vendors.

Every year thousands of Thoroughbred ex-racehorses, often referred to as OTTB, (off-the-track thoroughbreds) retire from the racing industry, their future uncertain. Many well-meaning horse enthusiasts seek to take these horses and retrain them for sport and recreational purposes.

This book takes the accumulated experience and knowledge of horse trainer Scott Brodie—Manager of the NSW Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Trust and re trainer of hundreds of ex-racehorses—and allows the novice trainer to tap into this valuable source of information previously unattainable for the average horse enthusiast.

Scott Brodie author of Horses From Courses is Manager of the RacingNSW Thoroughbred Retraining Program. A NSW Mounted Police horse trainer and classically trained rider, Scott has a has a generously empathetic philosophy to handling horses and a unique spin on the retraining of retired racehorses. Utilising a surprisingly smooth synergy of natural horsemanship and the practical application of classical dressage, Scott’s systematic approach to this often difficult and dangerous endeavour ensures the smoothest and fairest transition for the horse from racing machine to a pleasurable riding partner.

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