Great and safe product, what’s not to like.

 

A big shout out to bounce back fencing who have supplied materials for us to fence our new training arena and yards which are under construction at Cana farm. I love the product , it’s hard to imagine why you wouldn’t use it. It has the look of post and rail, is super easy to install, requires no maintenance and last much longer than timber. Not to mention it is safe for your horses. Every big stud knows how much damage young horses can do to themselves on post and rail no matter how careful you are.

Its great to have bounce back as a supporter of the thoroughbred rehabilitation trust. It’s a credit to them to put back into the industry on which they survive.

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re training the ex racehorse part 10

 

Once the work in hand and lunging are established it is time to start the horse under
saddle. All of the systematic work previously carried out has led us to this point.
If the horse is working with the four essentials, forward contact on the outside reign,inside flexion, tempo and Rhythm you can be pretty certain that there will be a smooth transition to the ridden work.
By this time, any idiosyncrasies the horse may have should have been exposed, if at any time you are uncertain about mounting the horse seek experienced assistance.
Every workout at this point should move through work in hand into a minimum of 20
minutes lunging or however long it takes to have the horse traveling as you would like him to whilst ridden.

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Part 9 re training the ex racehorse

Once the work in hand has been established it can be extended to lunge work, utilising the same principles, consolidating the outside reign contact with more forward impedus. Working to the horses easiest side initially, generally the left, the best side should have become obvious during the flexion in halter work, fix a long side reign between the girth and the bit on the right side. The side reign should be adjusted so that when the horse is standing relaxed there is no contact on his mouth this will encourage the horse to reach long and low when he seeks out the outside rein contact. Take a long rope lead, slide it through the ring of the bit on the left side and attach it back to the girth on the same side. Holding the lead reasonably close to the bit ask the horse to flex to the inside then ask him to step across with the inside hind leg. Basically we are now working the horse in hand but with only the inside reign available to us, the outside fixed side reign becomes our consistent outside reign. Walk the horse forward applying all of the earlier described principles developed in the work in hand section, as long as the flexion can be maintained to the inside and contact on the outside reign, the distance the handler is from the horse can be gradually increased. Eventually the horse should be lunging around the handler at the walk on the end of the long lead. Once this is consolidate the horse can be moved into trot.

for further and more detailed information see, “Horses from courses” retraining the thoroughbred ex racehorse,  by Scott Brodie on E book available from Apple I books, kindle, Amazon and other E book suppliers.

 

Part 8 re training the ex racehorse

As the horse is moving around you in leg yield ask him to halt at the time he is closest and parallelto a fence or wall. This needs to be solidly established, utilising both voice command and a physical halt aid initiated and support by inside flexion. By breaking the alignment of the horses spine with inside flexion and bend and a slight leg yield we reduce the horses ability to resist and with well timed reward will promote submission leading to to soft and obedient halts and eventually transitions in general . Eventually you will be able to move along the wall periodically flexing to a halt combined with voice command. Utilising the whip and voice commands ask the horse to walk forward and then halt repeatedly until it becomes
conditioned reflex.

Horses From Courses
by Scott Brodie

Available for purchase on Apple iBooks, Google Books, Amazon Kindle, Kobo and other online ebook vendors.

Every year thousands of Thoroughbred ex-racehorses, often referred to as OTTB, (off-the-track thoroughbreds) retire from the racing industry, their future uncertain. Many well-meaning horse enthusiasts seek to take these horses and retrain them for sport and recreational purposes.

This book takes the accumulated experience and knowledge of horse trainer Scott Brodie—Manager of the NSW Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Trust and re trainer of hundreds of ex-racehorses—and allows the novice trainer to tap into this valuable source of information previously unattainable for the average horse enthusiast.

Scott Brodie author of Horses From Courses is Manager of the RacingNSW Thoroughbred Retraining Program. A NSW Mounted Police horse trainer and classically trained rider, Scott has a has a generously empathetic philosophy to handling horses and a unique spin on the retraining of retired racehorses. Utilising a surprisingly smooth synergy of natural horsemanship and the practical application of classical dressage, Scott’s systematic approach to this often difficult and dangerous endeavour ensures the smoothest and fairest transition for the horse from racing machine to a pleasurable riding partner.

Part 7 re training the ex racehorse

Gradually encourage and allow the horse more opportunity to reach forward to the outside contact and utilising the dressage whip applied to the same region at that which your leg would contact, encourage the horse to move in a more forward direction around you on an increasingly larger circle. The horse is now performing a leg yield, move the horse in leg yield out onto a wall or fence, have the horse walk calmly forward with inside flexion and outside rein contact, the wall will now eliminate his ability to step sideways and encourage true forward into the outside rein.

Scott Brodie author of” Horses from courses “is Manager of the Racing NSW Thoroughbred Retraining Program. A NSW Mounted Police horse trainer and classically trained rider, Scott has a has a generously empathetic philosophy to handling horses and a unique spin on the retraining of retired racehorses. Utilising a surprisingly smooth synergy of natural horsemanship and the practical application of classical dressage, Scott’s systematic approach to this often difficult and dangerous endeavour ensures the smoothest and fairest transition for the horse from racing machine to a pleasurable riding partner. Available on Amazon

Part 6 retraining the ex racehorse.

Once the halter work has been established and can be carried out without resistance it is time to progress to similar work utilising the bridle.Firstly carry out the same exercises of flexing and bending in both directions and turn on the forehand as carried out with the halter, utilising only the inside reign held close to the bit. This should be easily established if the halter work was correctly carried out, it is important that this is the case as we want to avoid conflict with the bit at all times.

The next step is to take up contact on the outside reign. The outside reign should be running up the outside and over the horses neck and then to the handlers hand, contact should be similar to that which we require when riding a horse of this level, slightly more firm than we would expect of an educated horse in order to make the contact obvious to the horse yet still elastic, Our goal should be to make the outside contact inviting and comfortable for the horse to take. Initially we are responsible for establishing the contact but in time the horse should have as much responsibility as us for maintaining the contact, thus keeping open clear lines of communication. The horse should be gradually invited up to the outside contact by means of our forward driving aids, at this point our voice, our position, our energy levels and our whip.

Part 5 re training the ex racehorse

image

Every year thousands of thoroughbred ex race horses, often referred to as OTTB, (off the track thoroughbreds) retire from the racing industry, their future uncertain. Many well-meaning horse enthusiasts seek to take these horses and retrain them for sport and recreational purposes. This book takes the accumulated experience and knowledge of horse trainer Scott Brodie—manager of the New South Wales Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Trust, re-trainer of hundreds of ex racehorses—and allows the novice trainer to tap into this valuable source of information previously unattainable for the average horse enthusiast. Available in e book format from Apple I books and Amazon 

Part 6 The horse is already responding to the whip applying pressure to the hind quarter,
encouraging it forward and across, now step to the inside of what will be your circle, point the whip at the horses nose to encourage him to move out onto a small circle, initially at the walk. The horse should respond to the whip pointed at his nose, if he has learnt his lessons from the previous stages, he will move his head away from the whip. We are now able to move the horse away, by pointing at its nose and to make it move forward by pointing at it’s hind quarter. We should now have the horse moving around us quietly at the walk. Once this is established the handler should consolidate the halt command from walk by using the voice and causing the horse to face up with a tug on the lunge lead , these aids used simultaneously will eventually be replaced simply by the voice command.
Once the horse has a calm understanding of the above, increase your energy levels
until the horse begins to trot try to co ordinate the horses urge to trot off with your voice command to do so, this will eventually lead to the horse responding to the voice aid. Work on transitions up and down between walk trot and halt. Once these are calmly established introduce the canter aid in the same way you previously introduced the trot. Be aware of the horses capability regarding balance at this stage, he will canter better in one direction than the other this is normal, our aim here is to establish voice aids.
Do not proceed to the next level until this lunge work is fully established.

part 4 re training ex racehorses scott Brodie

 

This is the first step in teaching the horse to move into the outside reign and hence forward into contact. Stand at the horses shoulder facing his rear legs, holding your lead rope close to the halter. Slightly flex the horse to the inside, toward you, Tap the horse on the outside of the rear cannon bone closest to you. your goal is to have the horse step away from you with his hind quarters putting his inside hind leg forward and under his body. At this point you may find that the horse responds too dramatically this is not unusual, persist, don’t tap too hard, in some horses just a touch will be more than sufficient to achieve the result. Some horses will not respond at all and will need a more firm tap to get them to move that inside leg. It is imperative that the horse respond calmly and obediently to the touch of the whip, this will be important in later sections and is an integral part of the systematic training. Eventually a point of the whip will suffice but be certain that the horse responds well to the touch.

Part 3 re training the ex racehorse

part 3 re training ex race horses scott brodie

flexion and bend are terms sometimes misunderstood basically flexion happens at the poll, there can be lateral flexion side to side and vertical flexion, up and down. When speaking of bend we are usually referring to the bend longitudinally through the horses spine. In the early stages of this training program flexion will always be used in conjunction with bend, the refinement as the horses education progresses will allow flexion on its own merits to become a very influential aspect of control.

Most horses will flex and bend better to the left than to the right, for a horse to perform we must try to assist the horse to develop the subtleness to be able to flex and bend equally in both directions. Further to this and importantly, to set himself to buck a horse must be able to straighten his spine. If the act of flexing and bending
become conditioned reflex to the aid, the rider places himself in
a strong position to avoid being dismounted by a fractious mount. Many race horses will
resist when being asked to carry out unfamiliar manoeuvres so the ability to prevent
bucking is an important skill when training ex race horses or any horse for that matter.

part 2 retraining ex racehorses

All aids to your horse rely on your application of some pressure, be it on the bit, With the leg, seat,whip or spur, the horses yielding to that pressure confirms his understanding and obedience to your communication. Most racehorses do not yield to pressure in anyway except to run away from it or lean in to it. Racehorses notoriously lean into the bit contact unless they are galloping flat out, they run away from the whip for obvious reasons based on the way it is applied.
The horse needs to learn to respect and respond to pressure as a means of
communication rather than discomfort to be run away from or push against.